National endowment for the arts dance grants

National endowment for the arts dance grants

All of our mentored online courses come with six weeks of 1-on-1 professional coaching and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! Share your goals with us and we’ll find a course for you, or create a custom mentorship session with a pro musician, engineer, educator, or music industry veteran, to help you achieve them. 

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Julia Wolfe is an American composer whose music has been described by the Wall Street Journal as having “long inhabited a terrain of its own, a place where classical forms are recharged by the repetitive patterns of minimalism and the driving energy of rock.” Need I say any more?! Only perhaps that she too has won a Pulitzer Prize! Her incredible work Anthracite Fields picked up the award back in 2014. A founding member of the internationally renowned contemporary ensemble Bang On a Can, Wolfe has won more awards to mention and has worked with icons such as John Cage and Colin Curry, among countless others in performance. Julia Wolfe is a serious household name and continues to create ground-breaking work.

Small museum grants

Our beloved Q-Town is becoming an in-demand stop for worldwide touring acts, performing at the city’s most iconic venues, such as Burt’s Tiki Lounge and the Sunshine Theatre. But those are just a few of the many wonderful venues here. In order to fully appreciate Albuquerque sonically, you have to be creative in your efforts. Here are some of our favorite spots!

Electric guitars are a bit more complicated. There are more parts involved when recording this instrument, such as the amplifier, the speaker cabinet, and any effects pedals — all in addition to the guitar, itself. Because of this, we’re going to focus mainly on recording electric guitars for this article.

There’s an old studio saying: “Crap in, crap out.” No amount of mixing is going to save a bad vocal recording, so it’s important that you get it right at the source. Unfortunately, you probably don’t have much say over the recording process if you’re already at the point of mixing. But if you can get your hands on the raw tracks, you’ll be able to cherry-pick your favorite words or lines from each take and comp them together to create the ultimate Frankenstein-style performance.

This attention to detail only serves to dress the context that much closer so that we become invested in the drama with little to no restraint. We’re invited to take part in the world of the film’s fictional band, The Wonders.

“Happier”: Wait, no… what are you… no! Not the dog, come on, man, not the dog, what are you doing to me, Marshmello? Okay, so here’s a form I’m not adequately equipped to categorize or compare to anything else: what’s stumping me is what to do with the three-bar space in between the pre-chorus and the solid chorus/refrain that’s introduced at the beginning. For now, I’m lumping it in with the chorus as part of a chorus variation. But you could also think of it as an extended part of the pre-chorus, especially as its lyric is taken from it. Or, I guess we could even call it an “interlude.” It’s slippery. I have to highlight the half-bridge that ends the song — you almost never see half-bridges.

Top 100 rappers

Start by copying down the kick MIDI, or try playing your bass sound like it’s a kick drum. After all, it should mirror your kick, maybe even exactly. As an example, here’s the bass line from Future’s “First Off.”

The bariolage part isn’t only exciting because of the chromaticism — all those repeated A’s are intense too, in a way that doesn’t come across fully in MIDI form or played on a piano. On violin, you’re not just hammering the same note over and over. You’re really playing two different notes that are both very close to being A — you alternate between the open A string and the D fingered at the equivalent of the seventh fret in the guitar. These two A’s are a little out of alignment with each other.

Soundfly welcomes new voices each month to offer unique perspectives, shine a light on unexpected musical worlds, and help our readers find their sound.

When you pluck a guitar string, it vibrates to and fro. You can tell how fast the string is vibrating by listening to the pitch it produces. Shorter strings vibrate faster, and make higher pitches. Longer strings vibrate slower, and make lower pitches. The scientific term for the rate at which the string vibrates is its frequency. You measure frequency in hertz (Hz), otherwise known as vibrations per second. The standard tuning pitch, A440, is the pitch you get when your guitar string vibrates to and fro 440 times per second.

The course goes deep in guiding students through the methods of learning how to sight sing more fluidly by mastering intervals and grasping harmony and chord theory, and offers tips and surefire strategies for making audition cuts (or dealing with cuts when they’re made on the fly!).